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April 25, 2022

You Said What?

With so many different means and components of internal and external communication in facilities, it is often difficult to direct the right messages to the right recipient at the right time.

Ryan Galea, CEO of VoiceFriend, explains how this dynamic software can unite all the stakeholders of a facility and serve as one system to streamline everything that is being said.


After the loss of his grandparent, who received terrible treatment in rehab after surgery, Ryan resolved to address some of the issues in post-acute care by buying a software company already active in that space and using his expertise to build it up. 

VoiceFriend addresses the problem of inefficient communication faced in facilities where the many different stakeholders, including residents, families, and employees make for a quagmire of related issues. 

With varying levels of technological proficiency among these stakeholders, there have to be many different methods in place for communicating and conveying information. 

This type of chaotic system means that information and things said often slip through the cracks or can only be found again after a lengthy search which wastes time and effort. 

While there are other tools designed to improve this problem, they often only cover a section of facility communication or don’t work well with software already in place. 

Ryan explains that VoiceFriend is not a tool but a system designed to serve as the core communication platform of facilities by which all other means of communication already in place pass through. 

The software can convey messages over a wide variety of platforms including text, phone, and even Amazon Alexa.

Recipients can set their own preferences to reflect how they would like to receive communications. 

VoiceFriend’s simplicity and ease of use are great strengths and by integrating it, a facility can dramatically streamline its communication and enhance processes already in place. 

 

FOLLOW RYAN AND VOICEFRIEND

 

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Transcript

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We communicated. Now what do I do with that information? What's the next step?

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Filling the shift, for example, stuff along those lines, where we're

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going with it because we don't want to be a tool. We want to be

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the core communication platform in the facility where everything goes

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through, where we link the system. It's like your payroll

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system, three hrs and so on.

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Welcome to the Nursing Home podcast, your goto

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source for professional insights in the long term care industry.

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Hear from leaders and experts as they share current and practical

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insights to help make the most of your day. I'm a long term care financial

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specialist. What that means is I help people plan for the inevitable.

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Nobody wants to think about getting old, but it's possible that someday we might need

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a little bit of care. Here's your host. Nursing home Administrator Turnpodcaster

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Schmoel, Septimashptimas.

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Welcome to this live recording of the

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Nursing home podcast, the podcast that you go to to

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listen and to understand and attend the nuances of

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the nursing home industry. In this episode, we have with us

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Ryan Galia. Ryan is the CEO of

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Voice Friend, a company that I've used personally as a nursing

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home administrator, and I'm very curious to hear where the company is

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today. But even before that, I'm going to talk about some of the issues and

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some of the problems as they affect the nursing home space.

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First of all, Ryan, welcome to the show. Thanks for having me. Excited to be

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here. Thanks for making some time for us. So before

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we get started, I know that our listeners know who I am a little bit.

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They don't know you yet. Can you give us the short version

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of how you got to doing what you're doing today?

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Absolutely. As you mentioned, Voice ran has been around for a period of

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time. My background was in investing

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mainly in the private equity space, my start in health care.

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We would acquire businesses and help grow them over

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time. A couple of years ago,

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there was an incident in the family that led me to

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kind of reevaluate my priorities and lead

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me to make the decision to go out and launch my own investment vehicle

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for business. And instead of building from scratch,

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given my experience working with businesses that already have a footprint,

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I decided to go out and actually buy a small business

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from an owner who's looking to retire.

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I focused on the post acute space specifically and we can get into

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why later and acquired boyfriend back

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in August of last year.

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So relatively new, very new to the company.

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So, okay, fascinating. So you went in,

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decided you needed to buy a business. Okay, let's continue down this path just

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for a minute because you can buy any business in

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the world. This is not a business. Was there a personal connection between

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you and this business or is this a business that you decided

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is the right business or both? A bit of both.

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So I wanted to buy something in the post acute space because

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I knew that I wanted to buy a software company.

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The motivation for doing this in the first place was that

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I had a grandparent who was really sick and she was quite young actually,

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and she had a

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poor treatment experience in

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rehab post getting surgery done.

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She ultimately passed and that made me realize you should really spend your time

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doing what you want to do. But it also made me realize that there's a

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lot of issues in the postcard space that needs to be addressed.

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And so I actually searched for over a year

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to find a software company in the space and got both with a

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few but ultimately landed on boyfriend

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where I felt there was just a lot of potential and optionality,

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I thought I had a good foundation. It was more of a

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canvas that I could paint rather than buying a more established business like an electronic

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health record where there's not many places you could take that.

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And as opposed to trying to start something from scratch unproven

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concept and spending years beta testing something which you may or

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may not get anywhere spending other people's money to

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see if your ideas make any sense. So you're taking something in the middle which

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I kind of like. Yeah, my background was in buying businesses

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so it kind of fit what I've been doing as a professional level prior to

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this. Okay, so you have

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the skills and experience to analyze a

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business and to see this is what you've done with other people's money. It's not

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for a chance you can do it yourself and you can get the reward that

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you are bringing to your clients. Okay, so interesting.

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So persecuted care space is on purpose.

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Software. I guess you wanted a software company.

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I mean, you could have bought a nursing home if you wanted to,

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you could have, could have done anything. But I guess you like software.

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Yeah, I've been programming since I was eight

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years old and I've always been a big software guy that

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minor in machine learning and so wanted to marry

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my interests and this seemed like the perfect combination.

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Okay, very interesting. Okay, so let's

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talk about some of the challenges that can exist for

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someone before the, before they bring in any solution,

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whether it's yours or a different one. What is the problem primarily that

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this is addressing? It's primarily a communication

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problem and that problem exists between the facility

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and various stakeholders, those being staff, family residents

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and referral sources. Family members want to stay informed

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about their loved ones. They need to be updated quickly in case of an emergency.

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Residents have varying needs depending on in

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certain situations, an individual might have Alzheimer's and

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require frequent reminders of meal time

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in that sense. And then on the staffing side, I think we all

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know there's a big shortage. And so finding ways to automate communication

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processes that they're doing every day leads to more efficiency, getting more fewer

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people, which is really, I think, the only way at this point that we're going

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to solve that issue. Okay, so from a problem

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standpoint, challenges that exist in the nursing home that they

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are specifically targeting is

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communication with the staff. That I understand. And if anyone who has tried to

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schedule even pre COVID and when people actually want it to work and

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you don't have to beg them to show up and pay them more money than

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you're making just so that they can take care of the residents to

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understand that there's a ton of texting calling,

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reminding all those types of things which can take up quite

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a bit of time and even whatever the method is, as a matter of fact,

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you put a message in a bottle and you send it out. But that's definitely

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a big piece. What about you mentioned communication with

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the residents. So, I mean, usually this is all it's

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in business, right? You can't provide care for the

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elderly remotely for the most part. So what

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does that mean? Many of them are not tech savvy. And what are you alluding

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to there? Yeah, and that's why I think having

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a solution where you meet the recipient at

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their technology level is super important. So we can

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send messages to phone, text, email,

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Amazon, Alexa, so it doesn't necessarily matter

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if they're not tech savvy, they know how to answer the phone and so they

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can get that communication directly to their phone. So if

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you want to use it for wellness and safety, check in. Say there's an incident

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and you want to know quickly, where is everybody in my facility, you can

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have a call place to the rooms for everybody and have them answer

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and click one to indicate that they're safe and there's no issue.

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There is an issue. Let the system alert the correct

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person to go in and check on that person physically in real

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time. Okay, I'm just trying to understand

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that a bit. But you're saying they're going straight,

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but many don't have phones in every room, right? Like sometimes the long

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term residents won't have phones unless they have their own cell phones. Short term

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might have somehow for everybody, but at least for where they have,

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then you can use it that way. But as far as the challenge is

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concerned so let's say there's an incident,

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let's say there's a fire, God forbid, or something, some major incident

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going on in the building. You need to know quickly where everybody is.

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So every nursing has a red book

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or something on all the nursing station. It's going to say,

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this is what we do in case of emergency. Obviously, if there's an emergency,

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nobody opens it up. Everybody panics unless they're really well

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trained, but it can be used as a reference. And one of

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the things obviously is taking account, let's say our fire drill. That's a good example,

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right? So it's done frequently and everybody knows where to

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go. The doors are going to close, they know where to meet, and there's a

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count that happens manually with the paper,

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and it can happen quite quickly.

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Now, is it accurate? I don't know.

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But there definitely is a challenge. What happens if you miss somebody?

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The family, they need to be notified.

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And so I spoke to nursing

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home administrators who would track and excel who the

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correct contact is for this type of in the family. And then they would go

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through and manually make those phone calls to everybody.

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And then rather than doing that, you have the message prebuilt.

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So when that emergency comes, you just click a button that goes to

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Preferred Communication Channel for each family member and resident.

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Now, what about as far as improvement?

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I'm just looking here as far as improving the quality

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of the care. So obviously I understand that as far as letting people know

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if something happened or being in touch with the quality ratings.

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So is there a way that this type of communication can improve the quality ratings,

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which is obviously very important to every nursing home operator?

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Yeah, and I'll give it an interesting and exciting example of

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something that just came out recently, and that's managing patient discharge from the skilled

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nursing facility. There's several issues that factor

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into there. One is your readmission rate from postdischarge

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to hospital will factor in your quality rating.

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There's also a penalty if your rate

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is too high. We've factored into a formula against that. And then there's bonuses

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on your reimbursements if you are in the top quartile.

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I don't know what the exact areas. And so we manage

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the cadence of follow up so a person is discharged

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to the home. It's now on the facility

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to keep track of all these individuals follow

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up, make sure they're okay to prevent them from being readmitted.

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We have a cadence that you can set yourself over the

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first 30 days where the individual will get an automated

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phone call, for example, on the first day, or the family member like a non

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made phone call. And there will be a survey asking, how's your

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appetite today? How are you feeling? And you can respond to

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that electronically. It will record those responses and then

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flag them if there's anything concerning to have a nurse

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reach out along that 30 day cadence, there will also be steps in

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there where it will create a task for a nurse or social worker to actually

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reach out manually. And so it came to that 30 days.

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It's small things that ultimately get people readmitted. They don't have access

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to food. You can get Meals on Wheels or

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something along those lines. They might feel a pain that they think is unrelated to

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why they're in the facility in the first place. But it could be an early

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sign of something and you can catch it with a program like

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this and keep it out. Another thing too is obviously if you do catch it,

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they can be readmitted to your sniff or skilled nursing

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facility within that 30 day window and it counts as

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the same qualifying state. They don't need to go to the hospital again.

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And so it's a good way to also make

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keep those the bed filled. If you need to be filled, the person needs to

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be taken care of. They don't have to go through the whole system again out

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of cost. And so overall in doing that, it improves not only

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the facilities rating and the referrals they're going to get from the hospital systems,

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but also significantly improves the quality

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of care that person's getting by just reducing those small chances,

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going under the radar. And so

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I know that like you mentioned the spreadsheets, I know that many people

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have set and made these calls manually and the

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postdischarge follow ups and incomes, it's also done by a

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highly compensated employee. Which means that

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besides the fact that it's done manually and

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obviously that means that when there's other things going on in the

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building, this is something that's going to be neglected. It's expensive to be

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done. And even if the calls are happening and they're being shared

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or they're being documented in some sort of shared spreadsheet,

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is the social worker being notified when they hear that there's

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no food in the house? Because they were supposed to go home with the daughter,

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and the daughter said that she had enough and ran away to

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whom is there and now the elderly seniors there.

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Like you said, it's very simple things. They can end up back in the hospital.

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And besides for the financial implications and

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for the facility just going to the hospital and

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expose themselves to everything else that's there, I mean, COVID is

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an obvious example, but even without that, a hospital is a place where very

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sick people go. The sickest people go there and we take someone

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who is from the most vulnerable, put them in a place where the most sick

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people are. It's never the best idea if you

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can avoid it. Obviously the best thing would be to get them back in.

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And ultimately what's going to happen is if

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they need to go back, they may end up staying, you know, for an extended

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period of time just so that they could qualify because the hospital doesn't want

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to be stuck with them either. So they could just be sending their languishing away

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while they could have gone right back to the bed that might still be

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waiting for them and continue with a cure right away.

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But that's a process. Also you're

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basically throwing technology at some of the antiquated

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process of what goes on in a typical nursing home. And this is like a

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good nursing home because this is high tech. We're using a spreadsheet. It's not a

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notepad. It's not a stone tablet

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that we're chiseling out this information and then

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using smoke signals to get it across the facility.

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We're using a spreadsheet and we even know how to share a spreadsheet. Yeah,

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but there's still big piece that are missing and a big piece of the automation

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that are missing. And most importantly,

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I love a statement from Steve Jobs. I posted a link to

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this in the show Notes, where someone challenged in one of his

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I don't know which product it was that he was introducing.

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They were asking him, what do you specifically know about

15:25.360 --> 15:28.862
Java? Something, some nerdy technicality.

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Tell us specifically about the work that you've done for this product.

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And obviously a techie in the audience asks this question.

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I'm not going to tell you the whole thing, although I think I remember a

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word for it because I love it. You can please some of

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the people some of the time. And then he let it go. His point was

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that what he said is that this person the problem with what this guy said

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is that he's right. I don't know everything that goes on in here, but in

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his rebuttal, he said some genius. And I think,

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unfortunately, some technology companies don't get

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he said, we don't start with our engineers and figure

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out what's the best technology that we can create and then go back

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to our customers, to them. I said, we start the

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other way around. We said, what is the best result we can create for our

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customers? What is the absolute best thing, the best experience we can give them?

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Then we go back to our engineers. They make that happen. Imagine having,

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I think the ipod was 1000 songs in your pocket or something like

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that. Now that sounds so stupid.

16:31.767 --> 16:34.972
I could have a micro SD card. I could

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have a billion movies. But that was

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like a thing. Imagine such a thing that was like earth shattering.

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How many tapes could it fit? Records can you fit in your pocket?

16:46.762 --> 16:50.172
Even CDs take up a lot of space. So it's like, all right, geeks,

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nerds, figure this out. I don't know how to figure it out. We want

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a tiny computer that's going to be able to fold up and still be just

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as strong and powerful as a big tower computer.

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Make that happen. I'm sure

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you've seen this. Everyone throws software at nursing

17:07.872 --> 17:11.617
homes. Maybe they throw software in other industries too. But I feel like

17:11.665 --> 17:15.172
for some of the nursing homes are targeted. They're so big and it's a

17:15.205 --> 17:19.237
big market and they're so behind in technology that everyone

17:19.300 --> 17:22.827
chose software at nursing homes. And perhaps you've

17:22.932 --> 17:26.287
looked at other products, other businesses to buy before you

17:26.350 --> 17:29.752
chose this one, but few. And it made

17:29.770 --> 17:33.802
them solve interesting problems. But what's most important

17:33.970 --> 17:38.032
is to make sure that we're starting with the results and

17:38.035 --> 17:41.577
then figuring out how to use the technology for it. So, like, the results.

17:41.607 --> 17:44.727
We want to make sure this patient I'm sorry, I'm going off on a rant

17:44.757 --> 17:48.657
here a little. We want to make sure that this patient ends

17:48.672 --> 17:51.157
up if they're home, they need to get back to the hospital, they need to

17:51.160 --> 17:54.097
get back to the nursing home. We want to make sure that A, we find

17:54.130 --> 17:56.902
out about it, that it happens right away, that we know about it, they know

17:56.920 --> 18:00.102
about it, that family members know about it. They want us to stay focused

18:00.132 --> 18:03.397
on that and ultimately that will make the

18:03.430 --> 18:07.782
product the most successful one is done that way. It's a great cliff.

18:07.947 --> 18:11.677
I know the exact one you're referencing. I was

18:11.695 --> 18:14.377
going to jump in, but I couldn't remember it. So not going to do it

18:14.395 --> 18:18.057
justice. But I mean, that's exactly it. The customers basically designed

18:18.072 --> 18:22.522
this product themselves. We worked with several facilities and

18:22.705 --> 18:26.212
we just kind of watched them and talked them and asked them what would

18:26.275 --> 18:29.797
make their lives easier and then built it and trialed it with

18:29.830 --> 18:33.817
them and went through a lot of iterations. But as you said, non engineering let

18:33.865 --> 18:37.987
we had simple tools that we let them explain

18:38.050 --> 18:41.437
them to them and let them kind of decide and design how they

18:41.500 --> 18:45.662
could be used to automate and speed up and become more efficient.

18:46.162 --> 18:50.077
Yeah. On the other side of the spectrum, you also have

18:50.170 --> 18:53.692
what they say about Henry Ford that if they would have asked them what to

18:53.740 --> 18:55.937
create, they would have asked for a faster horse.

18:56.587 --> 18:59.162
That's got to be good with a grain of salt.

19:01.462 --> 19:05.197
It's more about figuring out the exact problems that

19:05.230 --> 19:10.027
they want fixed and making sure you understand those correctly and then how

19:10.045 --> 19:13.582
the engineers work on the solution. Exactly right.

19:13.735 --> 19:17.427
That would fit, actually for the case of the faster horse

19:17.457 --> 19:21.147
because the end of the day, they wanted speed. They wanted efficiency and reliability,

19:21.267 --> 19:24.622
not have to deal with some of the challenges of having an animal and

19:24.655 --> 19:27.877
whatever else was involved there. I don't recall. It's been a little bit before my

19:27.895 --> 19:31.327
days happened, but nursing homes are not too far behind

19:31.420 --> 19:34.972
in many of these areas. So I mean, that really

19:35.005 --> 19:38.782
is amazing. Maybe tell us a little bit more about or maybe

19:38.935 --> 19:43.017
what is the one feature that you are most excited

19:43.077 --> 19:46.462
about that already exists within Voice Friend?

19:46.600 --> 19:50.497
Or maybe that's in development, something that you think is really

19:50.680 --> 19:54.500
exciting, new, innovative, that you would like to share with us today?

19:55.237 --> 19:58.357
We do have some exciting ones in the pipeline, but I don't think we're at

19:58.360 --> 20:00.952
the point where I could share them. I think a lot of people in the

20:00.970 --> 20:04.852
team would get pretty bad with me if I front random for

20:04.945 --> 20:08.452
the existing platform. When I looked at buying it,

20:08.470 --> 20:11.947
the reason was that the core is phenomenal. It's really easy to

20:11.980 --> 20:15.177
use. And the grouping logic in the backend, which people don't

20:15.207 --> 20:18.792
really recognize how important that is. But the ability

20:18.852 --> 20:22.557
to make as many communication groups

20:22.572 --> 20:25.867
as possible and have those ready to go and build it, to hit a button

20:25.990 --> 20:29.587
and have a message go to 1000 people

20:29.650 --> 20:33.437
and have it go to the exact type of communication that they prefer

20:33.937 --> 20:38.312
phone, text, email, whatever it is in the span of 30 seconds.

20:38.662 --> 20:42.507
It's really phenomenal that core technology is. I don't

20:42.522 --> 20:47.982
want to say anything about what we're working on next but we're

20:47.997 --> 20:53.300
going to build on that same idea but more

20:53.737 --> 20:57.022
automating workflows without getting into too much using

20:57.055 --> 21:00.800
that to automate. Okay, fair enough.

21:01.537 --> 21:04.117
I'm not going to make you spill the beans and want anyone to get into

21:04.165 --> 21:08.382
trouble here. But the concept is to be able to instantly

21:08.472 --> 21:12.532
and almost effortlessly communicate to

21:12.610 --> 21:16.567
exactly the right people in exactly the way that they prefer to be communicated with.

21:16.615 --> 21:20.422
I assume we can respond to their responses. It probably depends on

21:20.530 --> 21:24.172
the method of communication. I've seen a very

21:24.205 --> 21:26.750
old version of it so I don't know what it looks like today.

21:28.912 --> 21:31.702
We're on 2.0 but we're going to 3.0 right now.

21:31.795 --> 21:35.472
I've seen the version that you saw and it is definitely quite dated.

21:35.517 --> 21:39.592
But yeah, you can even reply with

21:39.640 --> 21:43.147
images too. Although we don't condone this. We did have one

21:43.180 --> 21:47.002
customer trying to use us to collect coded vaccine cards. So they

21:47.020 --> 21:50.907
sent out saying, hey can we text in your coded vaccine cards? And they texted

21:50.922 --> 21:54.575
pictures of them. Not supposed to do that but

21:56.287 --> 21:59.527
they didn't use it for that use case. That's one example. Why are you

21:59.545 --> 22:02.622
not supposed to do that? Because it's not secure.

22:02.817 --> 22:06.622
Yeah, it's not. Typically you can't over the

22:06.730 --> 22:10.117
SMS. You could if it was over our data because our platform

22:10.165 --> 22:13.602
is to be compliant. But as soon as it goes onto the network it's

22:13.707 --> 22:15.962
out of that kind of bubble of compliance.

22:17.062 --> 22:20.077
Got it. But they did what they needed to do.

22:20.245 --> 22:24.247
There was a software, I will tell you from my nursing scheduling days,

22:24.430 --> 22:27.877
it was considered new then. It does go back a number of where you were

22:27.895 --> 22:31.482
able to text people. You're able to pick up a shift

22:31.647 --> 22:35.322
and you can see the response but you can't respond to their response.

22:35.442 --> 22:38.467
You would have to actually pull out your phone or to call them or text

22:38.515 --> 22:41.647
them once you see that they respond. So it was good if you had open

22:41.680 --> 22:45.327
shift and you had an exact group of CNAs

22:45.357 --> 22:48.757
that pick up on Mondays per diem or whatever so you

22:48.760 --> 22:52.072
could quickly send them. Actually probably wasn't. You probably had to

22:52.105 --> 22:55.627
manually pick each person. But the point is that it was

22:55.645 --> 22:58.777
something that was sold and appreciated even though it was

22:58.795 --> 23:02.067
so primitive that you couldn't respond to their responses. You couldn't pick up the conversation.

23:02.127 --> 23:05.632
I would hope that it's different now. Exactly. And that's exactly

23:05.710 --> 23:08.677
when I talk about workflow automation. It's okay.

23:08.770 --> 23:12.725
We communicated now what do I do with that information? What's the next step?

23:13.312 --> 23:17.052
Taking the shift, for example, stuff along those lines

23:17.082 --> 23:20.152
where we're going with it. Because we don't want to be a tool. We want

23:20.170 --> 23:23.977
to be the core communication platform in the facility where

23:23.995 --> 23:27.622
everything goes through, where we link these disparate systems like

23:27.655 --> 23:30.532
your payroll system, your EHR and so on.

23:30.685 --> 23:33.772
Very interesting. That kind of brought it together for me.

23:33.880 --> 23:37.222
You don't want to be a tool, you want to be a system.

23:37.330 --> 23:41.122
I'll tell you a hesitation that someone can have or maybe I

23:41.155 --> 23:44.412
used to have when constantly being pitched new software

23:44.487 --> 23:47.857
for nursing homes and everybody wants to be pointless care

23:47.935 --> 23:51.502
or some sort of like core system

23:51.670 --> 23:54.725
because obviously if you're in, then you're in a good place.

23:55.837 --> 23:59.632
And a lot of them take too.

23:59.785 --> 24:03.502
They solve too small of a portion of the problem

24:03.670 --> 24:07.417
to make them a core essential tool. And many

24:07.465 --> 24:10.552
times, they may not be friendly to the other tools that

24:10.570 --> 24:14.127
we're already using, and they end up either becoming

24:14.157 --> 24:17.975
a nuisance or just getting rid of them completely to create.

24:18.787 --> 24:21.952
You're not really replacing another tool, so you're trying

24:21.970 --> 24:26.537
to create something. You want to say that there's a lot of messy communication

24:26.887 --> 24:29.752
that currently exists within the nursing home,

24:29.845 --> 24:32.727
whether it's staff to staff, staff to residents,

24:32.832 --> 24:36.822
facility to people outside the facility, facility to other facilities,

24:37.017 --> 24:40.902
and it's happening in quite a haphazard fashion

24:40.932 --> 24:44.857
and multiple methods of communication. So basically

24:45.010 --> 24:48.502
you want to create the communication hub where

24:48.595 --> 24:52.212
that brings communication interesting as opposed

24:52.287 --> 24:55.717
to the way it's been pitched in the past.

24:55.765 --> 25:00.487
And the reason why we've used it in the past was it

25:00.625 --> 25:04.372
helped the scheduler sent out a lot of text at the same time. So instead

25:04.405 --> 25:07.722
of picking up your phone and doing one at a time and copying and pasting.

25:07.842 --> 25:11.872
So in the time it would take you to send out 30 texts to

25:11.905 --> 25:15.112
send out one text, you send out 30. And whatever

25:15.175 --> 25:18.772
limitations it had after that, instead of manually sending or

25:18.805 --> 25:21.262
just the amount of the time it takes you to find the context, they're already

25:21.325 --> 25:25.152
there in the groups. Like you said, that was from the core functionality.

25:25.332 --> 25:29.392
It was used mostly as a tool and it was a tool for

25:29.590 --> 25:32.847
if a resident falls. We once got a tag

25:32.892 --> 25:36.787
for that, that somebody fell or some sort of incident happened.

25:36.850 --> 25:40.507
The person was supposed to be notified, they were not notified at

25:40.510 --> 25:43.702
all, or maybe they were notified after the time frame and sometimes you don't want

25:43.720 --> 25:47.002
to notify them right away. Right. So you're hoping that maybe it really wasn't a

25:47.020 --> 25:50.302
fall or whatever, but if you automate the process kind of takes out

25:50.320 --> 25:54.322
the human error or misjudgment factor as long as the process

25:54.505 --> 25:58.147
is set up properly. That's exactly right.

25:58.180 --> 26:01.897
And those use cases will always be part of the product.

26:02.080 --> 26:05.302
We don't want to obviously take away from the way

26:05.320 --> 26:08.572
people use it now. But I think going that extra step of now

26:08.605 --> 26:12.697
taking the communication and doing something with it is

26:12.730 --> 26:16.057
kind of where we want to head. Okay, so a

26:16.060 --> 26:19.317
few things. Number one is that we're not just a tool, we're a hub.

26:19.377 --> 26:23.002
And number two is we're actually going to be part

26:23.020 --> 26:26.437
of doing the work. And we're not just talking about

26:26.500 --> 26:29.697
doing the work. I guess some sort of a project management

26:29.742 --> 26:33.217
software or son of sorts or something like that.

26:33.340 --> 26:36.877
Maybe not getting all as you said,

26:36.895 --> 26:40.372
there's communication coming from every which way. This thing out of you. If it takes

26:40.405 --> 26:43.602
me an hour now, joking, I don't want to spoil

26:43.632 --> 26:47.075
anything because it takes time to develop everything as we go. Of course.

26:49.237 --> 26:52.177
No, I get that. Well, let me ask you another question.

26:52.270 --> 26:56.247
As far as facility physician communication.

26:56.442 --> 27:00.472
I remember way back when Punk Care actually had a separate app

27:00.580 --> 27:03.927
for nurses communicating with physicians, and I'm

27:03.957 --> 27:06.277
not up to date. I don't know if right now is there's a way of

27:06.295 --> 27:09.727
doing it within fungal care, but it's definitely a

27:09.745 --> 27:13.342
problem because a lot of it happens over text,

27:13.390 --> 27:16.467
whether it's supposed to happen or not. Doctors don't want to be cold,

27:16.527 --> 27:20.152
nobody likes to be cold anymore. If you could text right, who likes to talk

27:20.170 --> 27:24.022
to people, is there anything? And if there isn't something to think

27:24.055 --> 27:27.097
about, there isn't anything in the works for that.

27:27.130 --> 27:30.852
I'll say that. But this is interesting. I mean we were thinking about getting involved

27:30.882 --> 27:34.237
with transitions of care, the hand off part

27:34.300 --> 27:37.912
process, but this is actually an interesting application as well.

27:38.050 --> 27:41.452
The idea is to build the core platform and then identify these

27:41.470 --> 27:45.322
other use cases that we haven't thought of and build what is needed for

27:45.355 --> 27:48.912
the affiliate. How that communication? I'm just saying that if you're

27:48.987 --> 27:52.842
sticking to this concept I love the concept of the communication

27:52.902 --> 27:56.722
hub for the facility that when you want to communicate with

27:56.830 --> 28:00.802
anyone, it's always through this one central place.

28:00.970 --> 28:04.102
Even within as administrator, you have a WhatsApp group with it,

28:04.120 --> 28:07.312
with the marketing team. You have another WhatsApp group with this. You have a text

28:07.375 --> 28:09.997
group for the people who don't have WhatsApp. You have a Facebook group with these

28:10.030 --> 28:13.475
people. A lot of times you don't even know how to communicate with people because

28:13.837 --> 28:17.352
a lot of it you have to remember this person has WhatsApp this person doesn't.

28:17.382 --> 28:21.232
This person is in the email and that's just within the management team sometimes.

28:21.310 --> 28:24.642
And also have to remember that there's other levels of communication.

28:24.702 --> 28:27.922
There's regionals, there's the owners, there are people

28:27.955 --> 28:31.837
who have access to only certain facilities. So if

28:31.900 --> 28:35.277
sticking to the vision of the communication hub,

28:35.382 --> 28:39.427
I would say that physician to facility communication could

28:39.445 --> 28:42.892
be critical. Transitions of care maybe

28:42.940 --> 28:46.042
doesn't fit into that. I'm just giving my true sense. There's a lot of companies

28:46.090 --> 28:49.297
that do that already. Yeah. I'm not saying you should.

28:49.330 --> 28:52.777
Or shouldn't do it, I guess. Yes. Communication facilities and facilities. I guess

28:52.795 --> 28:56.172
I could fit there too. If you want to communicate, for example, the admissions

28:56.217 --> 28:58.562
process. Right. So every time they get a referral,

28:59.587 --> 29:03.247
that's a big antiquated process that's a bit more

29:03.280 --> 29:07.467
complex than just emailing and texting because you have all the documentation

29:07.527 --> 29:10.207
going back to a lot of competition in that space. I'm just thinking, I know

29:10.210 --> 29:13.777
of a whole bunch of companies I'm thinking of right now that

29:13.795 --> 29:17.722
work there and some of them only do that.

29:17.905 --> 29:21.327
And then you also get into issues with integrating

29:21.357 --> 29:25.167
with the HR platforms and things like that. That's where we're really strong. Our integrations

29:25.227 --> 29:28.522
are phenomenal. We have a two way with point click care.

29:28.630 --> 29:32.217
So for the patient discharge, those survey results

29:32.277 --> 29:34.562
will be pushed into the person's chart.

29:35.887 --> 29:39.457
Interesting. Yeah, that's our big thing. We've been really big on

29:39.460 --> 29:42.382
the integrations because we want to be that layer on top of all the platform.

29:42.460 --> 29:46.777
It's to centralize that communication. These deep integrations are okay.

29:46.870 --> 29:50.077
Very interesting. Okay. I'm excited to

29:50.095 --> 29:53.947
see where this is going to go. For me, it's personally interesting

29:54.055 --> 29:57.862
because like I said, I've used them as a antiquated tool,

29:57.925 --> 30:02.532
but a tool that works nonetheless. Maybe then it was somewhat advanced

30:02.697 --> 30:05.872
and then I'm actually excited to see that you're in here

30:05.905 --> 30:09.532
and taking it to the next level. It sounds like

30:09.685 --> 30:13.252
ready up to 3.0 is on

30:13.270 --> 30:16.702
the horizon before we let you go. I didn't realize how

30:16.720 --> 30:19.597
long this is going to have a good time here. Before we let you go.

30:19.630 --> 30:23.152
Anything in particular that you would want to leave off with our listeners in

30:23.170 --> 30:26.947
regards to voice friend? Any final words about that?

30:26.980 --> 30:29.825
And then we'll let them know where to learn more about you and the company.

30:30.637 --> 30:33.982
Absolutely. I think the one thing I'll say, getting back to

30:33.985 --> 30:38.172
the message when you're talking about Steve Jobs and all that is that we're

30:38.217 --> 30:41.857
building the product for the nursing homes. We're not building it

30:41.860 --> 30:45.642
for ourselves. And so we can create a solution.

30:45.702 --> 30:49.597
You just need to tell us the problems around communication. And so anyone who

30:49.630 --> 30:53.542
has anything that they think is great, come to us and we'll automate it.

30:53.665 --> 30:56.827
Our goal is to make your life easier and solve a lot of

30:56.845 --> 30:59.300
this. Staffing choice. Okay.

30:59.662 --> 31:03.432
Amazing. Very interesting. Very fascinating.

31:03.597 --> 31:07.237
You're touching on staffing and I can't not respond to that as

31:07.375 --> 31:11.232
being that I work for and manage quality recruitment company for nursing

31:11.247 --> 31:14.722
homes. I have to jump in there. How specifically does this

31:14.755 --> 31:18.802
help for staffing? And so right now in

31:18.820 --> 31:22.102
the current form, the main points is

31:22.120 --> 31:25.972
just communication with potential applicants using the

31:26.005 --> 31:29.167
module so you could schedule messages to send to them,

31:29.290 --> 31:32.697
send them updates on the application process. How that's

31:32.742 --> 31:36.262
proceeding? Staff, the main use cases are

31:36.400 --> 31:40.042
for compliance, keeping track of when their certifications are coming up

31:40.090 --> 31:43.462
and notifying them automatically. The staff open

31:43.525 --> 31:47.987
shift, call out meeting, scheduling, general updates and alerts,

31:48.937 --> 31:52.487
that part I get. But people who don't yet work for the facility,

31:52.987 --> 31:56.122
are you integrating with job boards and becoming an

31:56.155 --> 31:59.212
ATS as well? Or is it just once you already

31:59.275 --> 32:02.600
have them, it's just focusing on the communication piece.

32:02.962 --> 32:06.852
Yeah, we don't want to become an applicant tracking

32:06.882 --> 32:08.987
system. That's not our goal.

32:11.287 --> 32:14.675
People do use us kind of like that already, in a sense,

32:15.037 --> 32:18.447
but we're

32:18.492 --> 32:21.427
much more interested once you get the person there.

32:21.595 --> 32:24.742
It's a problem to tackle. I'm not saying maybe down the road,

32:24.790 --> 32:28.747
but right now it's not necessarily on our horizon. Although the use product has been

32:28.780 --> 32:31.687
used for that use case. We just want the vision to be clear,

32:31.750 --> 32:35.087
because jack of all trade is master of none.

32:35.887 --> 32:39.127
Right. Because a lot

32:39.145 --> 32:43.327
of things can be called communication, but that might not be primarily what it is.

32:43.420 --> 32:47.137
Okay, very interesting. Very fast. I'm very curious to see if someone wants to go

32:47.200 --> 32:49.672
let's say I want to go through a website and I want to see what

32:49.705 --> 32:52.250
it looks like. Is there any video there?

32:52.612 --> 32:56.122
Yes, we're doing a redesign right now, so I'm just trying to think where things

32:56.155 --> 32:59.302
are. There should be videos on there. If not, we have

32:59.320 --> 33:02.737
a video page and they can all be accessed there.

33:02.800 --> 33:05.877
We also do live demos, so you can book that directly

33:05.907 --> 33:08.797
through the website pretty easily. And we're always happy.

33:08.905 --> 33:12.575
Just even curious to see what it looks like to show you.

33:13.312 --> 33:16.942
Amazing. I just see it now and it's definitely

33:16.990 --> 33:19.867
a completely different website since I looked at it.

33:19.990 --> 33:23.377
Amazing. Listen, Ryan, it's been great having you on the

33:23.395 --> 33:26.722
NSA home podcast. It's fascinating to see kind of

33:26.755 --> 33:30.727
check in, I guess, to see what Boyfriend is up to. I'm glad to see

33:30.895 --> 33:34.777
some of the things that you're doing. So if

33:34.795 --> 33:37.612
you want to learn more, then you go to Voice Friends. Looking at the website

33:37.675 --> 33:40.717
right now. Is it voicefront? Net? Voice Friend. Net.

33:40.765 --> 33:44.375
not.com net, unfortunately. Okay.

33:47.587 --> 33:50.922
Voicefront.net is where you'll go to learn more information. Ryan,

33:50.967 --> 33:54.952
you've been a fabulous guest. I really enjoyed chatting with

33:54.970 --> 33:58.282
you today. And for those who are watching

33:58.360 --> 34:02.292
on Facebook, if you're watching on LinkedIn, thank you for joining

34:02.427 --> 34:05.722
and head on over to Voicefriend. Net to learn more

34:05.755 --> 34:09.567
about this. To listen to this podcast

34:09.627 --> 34:13.702
or any of the past and future podcasts can head on over to

34:13.720 --> 34:17.397
the nursinghomepodcast.com or wherever

34:17.517 --> 34:20.577
you get your podcast. All right. Thank you, Ryan.

34:20.607 --> 34:23.150
It's really much for having me. Great.

34:33.787 --> 34:38.307
Now that you've enjoyed this episode of the Nursing home podcast,

34:38.472 --> 34:42.142
I'd really appreciate if you'd rate this podcast and let

34:42.190 --> 34:45.322
everyone else know what an amazing resource this

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slash nursing home. Again, rate this Podcast.com

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35:01.240 --> 35:04.527
an amazing show this truly is. Thank you so much for listening.

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And make sure to stay tuned and subscribe so you don't miss

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any other episodes.